Turnip
Pandey M and Shukla VK from Medical College PO, Kerala,
India found that consumption of cruciferous vegetables,
beans, onion and turnip led to a reduction in odds for
gallbladder cancer. [1]

Turnip, this root vegetable, has been found all over Europe
and Asia for centuries. A turnip looks larger than a radish
and is a well-known food source for both the root and
greens. Turnips come in all shapes, sizes, and colors.
Turnips are available year round with a peak in the fall and
winter months. Select smooth surfaced roots that are firm
and heavy with some root hairs at the bottom. In general, the
smaller the turnip, the sweeter the taste is. Turnips keep well;
cut the greens and bag them separately from the root placing
them in the crisper section of the refrigerator for up to a
week. Turnips can be peeled before cooking, eaten raw or
diced. When cooking this delicate root, cook only to the just
tender point; avoid over-cooking as sweetness will diminish.

The serving size for turnips is 1.5 cup or 78 g. It has about 15
calories, 0 calories from fat, 0 g of total fat, 0 mg of
cholesterol, 10 mg of sodium, 4 g of total carbohydrate, 2 g
of dietary fiber, 2 g of sugar, 1 g of protein, 0% daily values
of vitamin A, 15% of vitamin C, 2% of calcium and 0% of
iron. [Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie
diet.]

Pandey M and Shukla VK Diet and gallbladder cancer: a case-control study.
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2002 Aug;11(4):365-8.

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