Alrex Side Effects and Warnings
What is Alrex used for?  Alrex is used for the temporary relief of the itching and
redness of the eye caused by seasonal allergies. Alrex should not be used to treat
contact lens-related problems.

Who should not use Alrex? You should not use Alrex if you have any of the following
conditions:
Eye infections caused by viruses, including herpes and chicken pox.
Eye infections caused by mycobacterium or fungi.
An allergic reaction to Alrex.
Special Warnings for Alrex:

Long-term use of Alrex or other eye drops that contain steroids may result in
glaucoma, and cataracts. If you already have glaucoma, tell your doctor.

Long-term use of Alrex or other eye drops that contain steroids may lower your ability
to fight infections and may increase your chance of getting an eye infection.

Using steroid eye drops may make viral diseases of the eye, such as herpes simplex,
worse and last longer.

Using steroid eye drops after cataract surgery may delay healing time.

General Precautions with Alrex:

You should contact your doctor if pain develops, or if redness or itching gets worse.

Tell your doctor if your symptoms do not get better within two days. He/she may want
to re-evaluate your condition.

You should not use Alrex longer than 10 days without having the pressure in your eye
checked by your doctor.

What should I tell my doctor or health care provider?
Tell your doctor or health care provider if you: wear contact lenses because you should
not wear contact lenses if your eyes are red.
wear contact lenses and your eyes are not red. You should wait at least 10 minutes
after using Alrex before putting in your contact lenses because Alrex contains a
preservative that may be absorbed by the lens.

What are some possible side effects of Alrex? (This is NOT a complete list of side
effects reported with Alrex. Your doctor can discuss with you a more complete list of
side effects.)

Increased pressure within the eye (see special warnings)
Blurring of vision
Burning when putting drops in the eye
Swelling or discharge around the eyelids
Dry eyes
Tearing
Sensation of having an object in your eye
Itching
Redness
Increased sensitivity to light
Headache
Runny nose
Sore throat

Contraindications [1]

As with other ophthalmic corticosteroids, Alrex is contraindicated in most viral
diseases of the corneas and conjunctiva and in mycobacterial and fungal diseases of
the eye. Prolonged use of corticosteroids may result in secondary glaucoma, cataract
formation, and secondary ocular infections following suppression of the host response
and/or perforation of the globe. The most common adverse events in patients treated
with Alrex were abnormal vision/blurring, burning, chemosis, discharge, and dry eyes.

For more detailed information about Alrex, ask your doctor.
[1] http://www.bausch.com 2008
Alrex® (loteprednol etabonate ophthalmic suspension 0.2%)

Baush&Lomb:
The first corticosteroid specifically designed for seasonal allergic
conjunctivitis, Alrex® offers powerful relief against the whole symptom complex, i.e.,
itching, redness, burning, and photophobia.
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